This Oldest Daughter. Bookmaker.

The odds are that over the past ten years some of you might never have thought my book,  “Oldest Daughters—What to know if you are one or have ever been bossed around by one would ever be completed.  But that day has arrived!  The book

is available on amazon.com and

as  an ebook on kindle.com.

The book tells personal stories taken from in-depth interviews with more than 100 first-born daughters, siblings, and spouses of various ethnicities.   Asked why they had agreed to be interviewed, a common response was

“I want to know that I’m not the only one out there feeling this way.

Another response  (from a sibling) offered a different point of view:

“I can’t believe I’m the only person wanting to know how to survive an oldest daughter.” 

First-born daughter revelations 

The book’s stories reveal the impact of the first-born daughters role on her adult life, her siblings and family relationships.

Results are also included  from an online survey of several hundred adult family members about their experiences and feelings.   They provide additional insights into the pride and pain, resentments and hopes of oldest daughters and those who share their lives.

At the end of each of the ten easy-to-read chapters, a contributing clinical psychologist (who is my own oldest daughter) adds self-help Insights and Reflections for restoring or improving sibling and family relationships.

Birth order is a fact; It does not have to be a fate.

 Oldest Daughters —What to Know… (available on amazon.com and as an ebook on kindle.com) affirms that changes are possible, potentially transforming and rewarding.

5 thoughts on “This Oldest Daughter. Bookmaker.”

  1. Egg-citing news! I want an autographed copy that I can sell on Ebay!
    On a more serious note, all of my heartfelt congratulations to my (don’t tell Aunt Suzie or Dona this…) favorite Aunt Pat. Time is our friend in all things that are worthwhile journeys.

    Having lived a fair percentage of my time now in Lake Wobegone, I am reminded of a quote of Garrison Keillor’s which I’d like to share. Again, well done girl-z. Kim Schudy (oldest, but never bossy…not always.)

    The father of a daughter is nothing but a high-class hostage. A father turns a stony face to his sons, berates them, shakes his antlers, paws the ground, snorts, runs them off into the underbrush, but when his daughter puts her arm over his shoulder and says, ‘Daddy, I need to ask you something,’ he is a pat of butter in a hot frying pan.
    -Garrison Keillor

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